God Loves You.    You Are So Beautiful  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                A story of Roxanne\

 

Note: Roxanne is a faithful member of DPUC with her profession as a nurse. She is the one who makes her profession a holy work.

 

I met a boy named John*, he was born at 26 weeks and was blind in one eye, hard of hearing and one of the friendliest 8 year olds I had ever met. Most of his life had been a struggle, his speech was late because he couldn't hear and the vision he did have was so poor in the one eye that sometimes he would bump into things at home.

 

He did not lack love. Born into a large family, John came as a surprise to his parents who were in their 40's when he arrived. His older siblings were happy to have him experience as much as he was able to. I think thats why he was so friendly, always with his big brother or father, he had no shyness, no fear of rejection. He just knew that if you got to know him, you would realize how awesome he was. 

 

When I met Kelly*, a two year old, I had no idea what was wrong, but I knew something terrible was happening. She looked like she had mumps to one cheek. She was sitting on her mother and I could only see one side of her face. I checked her immunization status to see if she got the mumps vaccine. She had. So I took her in my arms, surprised at how frail she was. The quickness of a child her age was not there. Her face was swollen only on one side. What happened to you, I asked.

 

One side of her face was swollen, her head was boggy and soft. Kelly cried and hugged me. Mother said she was out of town and left her with a cousin and really was unsure of what happened. Overwhelmed, I called the doctor who gave orders to have this child evacuated to a children's hospital for CT scan. We also had to call Child Protective Services to sort out the back story. Meanwhile my job was to put a spinal collar on this little child, insert an iv, and prepare for transfer.

 

Shelly* was a girl I admired greatly. I met her when she was 7, she is now 8. The week of her birthday she had a to go to the dentist because of a cavity. I met her just before her dental visit. You see, Shelly had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis so the medication she took, lowered her immune response. A cavity that a normal 7 year old would have, cause such massive facial swelling that she needed intravenous antibiotic therapy.

 

Thats how I met her. Someone had to put the iv in. She tolerated the whole thing without a whimper, took her dose and went to see the dentist about her tooth. The next week she returned facial swelling gone and looking very cute. It was a few days before her birthday. Why are you here, I asked. Her mother said she comes in every week for an injection the slows the JRA. Every week! Shelley nodded and rolled up her sleeve. Thats when she became my hero.

 

To share your reflection, sent the one to dpuc2095@gmail.com .\

 

 

 

                   The second mile

 

Though you¡¯ve done your best for others

There will always be

Something else that you can do.

Look around and see –

Someone is perplexed, in sorrow or distress,

Needing comfort, friendship, and a touch of kindliness.

Though you may be weary, having some the long hard way

You must go the second mile, its not enough to say

You¡¯ve fulfilled your mission, done your duty, borne you share.

There is another hill to climb, another load to bear.

God will never let us rest, content with what we¡¯ve done

Conscience drives us on, another battle must be won.

Somewhere, someone on the road

Is calling out to you.

Somebody is waiting for your hand

To pull him through.

 

Note: This is the favourite poem of Johanna Snydal, Marlene Mintz¡¯s mother who passed away January, 1999, Toronto, Ontario.